Jacksonville's 2017 List of Most Endangered Buildings

June 25, 2017

According to the Jacksonville Historical Society, here's a list of Jacksonville's 21 most endangered buildings in 2017.



15. San Marco Historic District


1925 to 1938

(State Archives of Florida)

As San Marco's popularity continues to increase, the neighborhood's historic building stock is in danger of being removed for new infill development.




16. Trophy Center Building


339 Park Street

(Ennis Davis, AICP)

Closed 2011, this is one of the best remaining Art Deco commercial buildings in Jacksonville.





17. Former YWCA Building


325 East Duval Street

(Ennis Davis, AICP)

Built in 1949 and designed by Jefferson Powell, a portion of this building will be preserved by Chase Properties Inc.  Chase Properties, Inc. plans to redevelop the site into a multi-family development.






18. Greyhound Bus Station


10 North Pearl Street


Completed in 1956, this station will soon be replaced by a new Greyhound terminal in Lavilla.






19. JEA/ Universal Marion Building


21 West Church Street

(Ennis Davis, AICP)

Completed in 1963, this tower originally contained a rooftop revolving restaurant called The Embers. The JEA will potentially demolish this structure if a buyer can't be found in a few years.

Interior Photographs Here



20. Wesley Manor (now Westminster Woods on Julington Creek)


25 State Road 13

(Westminster Woods of Julington Creek)

Designed by architect Robert C. Broward in 1964, it was the largest commission of his career and one of his most innovative. A St. Johns County PUD from 2015 indicates the demolition and replacement of nearly all of the Broward structures.






21. Chart House Restaurant


1501 Riverplace Boulevard

(Ennis Davis, AICP)

Designed by architect Kendrick Bangs Kellogg from California and completed in 1982, this is one of Florida’s best example of modern organic architecture. The American Institute of Architects Florida named it as one of the state’s top 100 buildings. Last September South Florida investor Ramon Llorens purchased the riverfront acreage in front of the Lexington Hotel & Conference Center. This 6.14-acre site includes the Chart House restaurant. He also purchased the Ford Motor Company Assembly Plant.

Source: Jacksonville Historical Society



For more information: http://news.wjct.org/post/jacksonville-historical-society-reveals-2017-list-most-endangered-buildings

 PREV 1 2 3

All rights reserved Modern Cities